PSP food drive aids impoverished community members

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PSP food drive aids impoverished community members

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As a way to positively impact
the community, students involved
in PSP held a food drive. Throughout
November, students were able
to bring food to the main office and
donate it toward the food drive.
Through participating in the
food drive, students in PSP were
able to learn about poverty and
methods to help end it.
“It’s service learning, learning
about an important issue, poverty,
while serving your community.
There are people in our area who
don’t have enough food, so we are
learning about why that happens,
how it affects people, and what we
can do about it, all while actually
doing something to help,” said PSP
teacher and social studies department
chair Chris Kubic.
The food drive doesn’t just attempt
to help people in poverty but
can also benefit the students assisting
in the food drive.
“PSP students gain a deeper
understanding of poverty and also
gain skills in leadership. Students
who donate get the satisfaction of
helping people in their community,”
Kubic said.
Helping impoverished people
can be an experience that makes
one look at the world around them
in a different way.
“Seeing the amount of food
that was being donated really
opened my eyes as to how much
people really care. I feel as though,
in this day and age, it’s very hard
to see people show compassion or
even genuinely care about other
people in their community. After
seeing how many people donated,
it really assured my that the community
I live in does care and wants
to make a difference,” said junior
Emma Jaworski.
Students were able to collaborate
with others to pick up the food
from local communities.
“I really think that by going
out and collecting food from the
local community made us strive
in collecting so much food. Some
people want to donate, but either
they’re elderly and it’s hard to go
out or they don’t have a car, and
other reasons. I think it was really
beneficial that we were able to go
out and assist people in the community,”
Moats said.
One food drive may not
change the world, but it will impact
the community.
“I know that people will still
struggle in the future with poverty,
but by doing my part now, I feel
that I have made a positive change
just by my participation alone. I
think that if everyone put effort into
helping the people around them,
the world would be less dull,” Jaworski
said.

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