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Theo Hayes

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Theo Hayes, head of security, has an extensive background when it comes to security practices. He has worked in other schools and malls before coming to North.
“I mainly got into security because of the interaction you get to have with people. It’s different because in law enforcement there isn’t that much connection than with being a guard in a community,” Hayes said.

The North security guards work together to be the eyes and ears of the school. They do routine checks of hallways and bathrooms after every passing period to check for any damage or perhaps alluding danger.
“That’s only what we do during the day. After school, we work to monitor all the practices, games, and any special requests. We are the first line of defense whether it’s good or bad,” Hayes said.

Security guards must acquire their security license before getting hired anywhere. This license requires 15 hours of training that includes first aid and defense on top of being able to handle an emergency and control panic. In light of fear of school shootings, school security is there to keep students safe; however, through social media, Hayes believes that communication has become critical for the safety of students.
“There’s a saying that I believe holds true ‘If you see something, say something’. Students have that responsibility that if they see something that they believe could be harmful they should report it,” Hayes said.

Lots of speculation has come around on how to decrease the threat of school shootings in the U.S. Many have believed implementing metal detectors, bulletproof windows, and possibly arming teachers. As the head of security, Hayes believes that these actions wouldn’t necessarily stop people’s fear about threats, instead it would create more confusion.
“I don’t think [arming teachers] will stop all the threats, and I do believe that many people reacted with these ideas out of fear and anxiety, but people neglect to think about all the training that goes through being able to legally carry a weapon,”           “Teachers should be focusing on their lessons, not about a weapon that could potentially end someone’s life.” Hayes said.

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Theo Hayes