Students adjust to high school

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People are told that high school will be the best years of life, but does society really understand the “not-so-fun” occasions? Walking through the front doors and saying “good morning” to the security guards every morning indicates the beginning of a new day; however, schedules during this time period can easily become hectic, exhausting, and extremely stressful.
“I juggle my school life and social life by getting all my school work done before going out with my friends, so I can have fun without thinking of what I have to do later. [However], my biggest struggle that I want to overcome is the tendency of losing focus during class and not being engaged,” said freshman Owen Einloth.
Balancing sports, friendships, family, academics, and clubs all at once is especially difficult. Soon the best years of life become frenetic, and the control that students once possessed dissipates in the flip of a switch. Even though schedules become more complex, high school still is a time to explore new opportunities and create unforgettable memories.
“One of my biggest tips for studying is to manage your time wisely. If you know you’re someone that loses focus easily, leave yourself plenty of extra time in case you get off track, or if you know you have a [time consuming] project coming up, get your studying done early so it doesn’t cause more stress along the way,” said sophomore Angelica Diaz.
Entering the building on your first day of freshman year marks the beginning of a new stage of life. It can be nerve wrecking and alarming, yet possibly relieving. Graduating eighth grade and entering high school is considered to be a rough transition, but it marks the birth of freedom as a young adult. Choices race through the mind and decisions could become more difficult, as students grow as an individual, the mistakes made are there to help them learn.
“One thing I enjoy about high school is that I get to be in the same classes and building as all my friends I have grown up with and have some freedoms within the school unlike elementary school,” Einloth

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